Author

Posts tagged “#fish

Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Shadow over Innsmouth, conclusion

Wow, so much in such a short chapter.  There is more in these last few pages than there had been in the previous 60, and truly, the majority of interest comes from the last two paragraphs of the story.

The narrator wakes from his faint, and headed back home.  He continues on his investigation of his lineage when he finds that some of the story of old Obed Marsh, was actually his ancestors.  The daughter who was married off to an Arkham man, was actually our Narrator’s great-Grandmother.  He sees pictures and sees the “Innsmouth look”.  He even finds out that an Uncle that he had committed suicide when he found out the truth.  Our narrator buys a gun, thinking, that maybe he will do the same thing, but his heart isn’t in it.  There is a strange draw back to the Innsmouth.  Back to the Sea.

So earlier in the story, they were not trying to chase him.  They did not tell him to go to the Gilman to trap him, they were bringing in one of their own.

The interesting point for the lore comes in the second to last paragraph.  It is here that I have seen the first mention of Cthulhu being a “Deep One”, and that has to mean that Dagon is related in some way to Cthulhu.  The narrator mentions that “the Deep Ones could never be destroyed, even through the palaeogean magic of the forgotten Old ones might sometimes check them.”  So the Deep Ones are evil in some way, because another “forgotten power” is checking them.

In addition to this we have the first sight (through the narrators eyes) of a Shoggoth.  I had previously thought these were a god in and of themselves, but the way they are described here, I think they are just a creature, as the narrator saw “a Shoggoth”.  This probably has something to do with the third contract of the Order of Dagon, because the narrator says he saw the Shoggoth in a dream, then when he woke from the dream screaming, he had all of a sudden acquired the “Innsmouth Look”.

So there is transformation which can occur.  There is also a distinct lineage connection, but I have to believe that there is still the ability for the transformation if there is no heritage of the Deep Ones.  I’m sure more clarification will occur the more I read on, but that’s what my hypothesis is now.

And then there is the Shoggoth.  From what I know of in the past, this is a creature that has many eyes and mouths (akin to a gibbering mouther in Dungeons and Dragons land), but apparently it also has some power.  It seems to have transformed the narrator, both in body and in mind, as he had lost knowledge that he could not have gain otherwise.  Either the Shoggoth is the method of transmutation, or it is the harbinger, just solidifying the knowledge that has already been transferred, by some ancient magic.

What do you think?

In any case, I cant wait to read on!  I will be moving on to “At the Mountains of Madness” by Del Rey next.  I will break the story up into approximately 25 page chunks so we can analyze each section, if you are reading along.

Join me tomorrow for the first 25!


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Shadow over Innsmouth pt. 4

We have now reached the denouement.  The background of the story has lead our narrator to try and flee that horrible mind-bending mess that is Innsmouth.

When the chapter opens our narrator has decided to get out of dodge, and goes to get to the bus, only to be told by the odd bus driver, that despite travelling to Innsmouth without issue, there is suddenly a engine problem and the narrator will have to wait the night.  Joe Sargent (the bus driver) tells our narrator to go to the Gilman to wait the night.  He even tells our narrator that he will get a great room rate.  They only charged him a dollar.

He waits the night away in his room and makes sure to lock and barricade the door.  He even looks for an escape route, just because he is scared.  Then late in the night there is a shuffling at the door, and someone knocks with increasing frequency when he doesn’t answer.

Our narrator gets scared and tries to flee through the hotel.  There is a fairly large chase sequence which is a little jumbled (Lovecraft is a master of tone and atmosphere, not action), but the narrator flees out the window and through the streets to get out of Innsmouth.

He faints when he sees a large contingent of fish creatures gather in town, creatures nearly too abhorrent to describe.

There are a few interesting visuals in this portion of the book.  The first is after he flees the Gilman, he tries to stay to the shadows, but he has to cross a street that has direct view of the waters, and he sees two different things of note.  The first is a strange light, emanating from out over the sea of a color he cant quite pinpoint.  And there is a churning of creatures coming to Innsmouth from the craggy rock that old Captain Obed frequented.  This image of the churning waters with “bobbing heads and flailing arms” that “were alien and aberrant” in a way he could not conceive.  This immediately brings about images of Cthulhu and the multi-tentacled beard.  Though these are smaller creatures, and probably more related to Dagon.

The unholy light however, of a hue unknown.  The moon is full and bright throughout the story, could it be the moon’s call?  The moon has called creatures in previous stories, could this be the call, and answer that we have seen in previous stories?

Beyond that there is one more aspect of the story which is really provocative.  There seem to be three different creatures in Innsmouth.  We have creatures that are simian based, which we have seen in many different stories , we have fish creatures which walk beside the simian creatures, and then we have something dog like, or what I like to establish as “beasts”.  The beasts are called from the moon in every other story, with the exception of “The Doom that Came to Sarnath” and there there are fish creatures which are called by the moon.

Are the beasts and the simian creatures (think “Arthur Jermyn” and “The Outsider”) the same thing?  Could Innsmouth be Sarnath in this age?

With the completion of chapter V of this story (which will probably be tomorrow) I have now read through two Del Rey Lovecraft books, and will get started into the third.  I would like to begin to get a timeline, or at least get to understanding the mythos and how they are connected on my own (and with the help of you all) without doing any research and see how my theories stack up.

What do you think?


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Shadow over Innsmouth, pt 3

The ravings of an old madman fill our minds through the next chapter of this story.  Our narrator gets some bootleg alcohol and gets the elderly Zodak Allen to follow him to a spot by the sea where they can talk out of prying eyes.  Zodak confirms a number of suspisions that I had previously while reading through, however he expounds more than expected and we are posed with more questions than he ended up answering.

Zodak tells of how Captain Obed brought the people of the Order of Dagon to the mainland, because he wanted to promote a healthy community.  The mills were dying out and the fish were getting fewer and fewer, but he remembered an island where the people had abundance.

The people of this Island mated with fish people.  Then twice a year they would sacrifice their young to Dagon in the sea, and they never ran out of fish.  The offspring that came from the human fish relations, started out as human, then began to transform as they got older, to the point of transitioning completely and leaving land and heading for the sea.  If we are to believe Zodak completely, then my previous theory is (mostly) out the window.

The interesting part of Zodak monologue to me, is the three Oaths of Dagon.  We never find out what these are, but we know that the many people in town took the first two (which had something to do with not telling anyone outside the cult of the cult inter-workings).  Zodak was wholly against taking the third Oath, which seems to me an Oath of body, soul and spirit.  This could be how, beyond interbreeding, the entire town of Innsmouth has begun to transform.  That third Oath, could be inviting the change into you.

We do know that the previous two oaths did give Zodak some knowledge however.  He knows of Shoggoth.  The mentions Cthulhu R’lyeh, which I’m pretty sure is the sunken city which is Cthulhu’s prison.  What is interesting about this is that Cthulhu is imprisoned under the water and Dagon is a god of the water.  Which means there is a definite connection there, and there is a connection with the Order of Dagon, because Zodak obviously learned this through his Oaths.

So now we have three deities in the mythos, concretely linked.  Shoggoth, Cthulhu, and Dagon.  Let’s see where this story leads us…

What do you think?

Join me next week for the last two chapters of The Shadow over Innsmouth.


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Shadow over Innsmouth, pt2

Back again with the second section of “The Shadow over Innsmouth”.

The second portion of the story is a slow burn and an introduction to the town itself.  We see a few different portions of the town, and how it is split up, between the poorer, more inhabited part of town and the richer, barren part of town.

When our narrator first comes to town on the bus, we get a brief glimpse of the bus driver, who holds all those same fish qualities that were described in the first section.  The driver is quiet and subdued, but obviously is reticent to take our narrator, and outsider, to Innsmouth.

While driving in, the narrator notices that the old Masonic hall has been transformed into “The Esoteric order of Dagon”, which he believes is a sort of cult.  He looks to the other side of the street and sees the church, which has a basement door open.  He sees a shambling figure of a priest wearing a diadem that looks nearly identical to the one he saw with Miss Tilton in the first section.

There is mention throughout the story that the children of Innsmouth look mainly like real children (at least the few that our narrator sees).  He postulates that if it is a blood disorder or a virus that changes the folks of this town to become more fishlike, then it happens after puberty.  This is yet another feather in the cap for the transformation theory, and nearly codifies the theory.  The more time they have exposed to Dagon, the more transformation occurs within them.  Thus the children don’t have much transformation because they haven’t had much time in the church, or on the island itself, thus they haven’t transformed very much.

As the chapter progresses we hear of an old man in his 90’s who knows much about the town, and when he gets drunk is liable to talk about it.  His name is Zodek Allen, and the narrator finds him on a bench at the end of the chapter.  This is probably going to lead to Zodek telling of a few of the mysteries of Innsmouth in the next chapter.

Join me next week for the next portion of “The Shadow over Innsmouth!”


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; Dagon

Back for another Blind Read.  I am trying to keep honest to the Blind Reads and not do research on the side to gather connections, but if my memory serves me correct, Dagon is one of the lesser gods in the Lovecraft pantheon.  That makes this story very interesting to me because this story could have wide ranging implications for the building of the Mythos (or apparently as Lovecraft called it, Yog-Sothothery.  It was actually August Derleth that coined the phrase Cthulhu Mythos).

The story follows our narrator during WWI, as his ship was taken by a German sea-raider ship.  He escaped them and found his way to a strange, unknown of island in his dinghy.  As he explores the island, he finds a strange monolith with images carved that are humanoid, but fish-like.  They have webbed hands and feet, they have large eyes and large lips, and they are huge, nearly the size of a whale.

As he stands there one of these creatures comes out of the sea and hugs the monolith, then prays to it.

The narrator immediately thinks of Dagon, who is an ancient fish god.

What is provocative about this story is that there have been small connections in the past with figures like Nyarlathotep, which make a connection with our actual world.  The difference, however is that in every previous story I’ve read the characters in the stories are fictional, in a real setting.  This is an actual god that people have worshiped in the past, and here Lovecraft uses the same name and adopts it as his own.  Thus bringing his pantheon into our cultural reality.

There are two different ways to look at the story.  One is that the creature that comes out of the sea is a disciple of Dagon, and the monolith is what it prays to in supplication to Dagon.  This event keeps Dagon as a god, and now we have a race of cthonic creatures, whom live under the sea and live under Dagon’s rule.

The other way to read it (and this is what i believe Lovecraft intended) is that the creature that comes out of the sea IS Dagon.  This is a much more horrific idea.  This means that this creature, which made the narrators mind break (“I think I went mad then”) at the mere sight of it, is actually supplicating to something more than itself.  So this creature which in our real life mythology is considered a god, has a being so much more powerful than it (Cthulhu himself?) that it prays through the form of the monolith.

What do YOU think?

Join me next Tuesday for another blind read of “The White Ship”.