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Archive for November, 2017

Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Unnamable

This story gives great perspective on Lovecraft himself, and we get a sneak peek at the illustrious Randolph Carter.

What was so great about this story was getting to see what Lovecraft really felt about the construction of his stories.  Carter, who is apparently a writer as well, has a long conversation with a friend of his about how to tell a story.  His friend persists that there is no scientific was that anything in the scientific world could be unnamable.  Any kind of creature would have to be contained within some sub-classification or genus, but then suddenly, at the end of the story, a creature of some sort comes out of an old house they have been sitting next to and attacks them.  Manton, the friend has a mental break down because what he saw he cannot classify.

What gives the story a bit more depth is that it seems as though the subtext was that Manton stayed at the place where the story unfolds and saw something horrible when he was younger (which is probably the same creature he sees at the end of the story).  The point is that he has spent his life trying to categorize to deny the horrible, un-categorizable thing he saw as a child.

Carter also seems to serve as a duplicate for Lovecraft himself.  There is a theme that streams through Carter’s descriptions, which stream through all of the Lovecraft that I’ve read thus far.

This was a really great story on the essence of horror tales, and about the writing process in general.

What do you think?

Join me next Tuesday for a blind read of “The Outsider”


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Hound

What a beautifully dark and Gothic tale this was.  Gorgeous in scope and so much more than a Poe tale.  We follow along a couple of grave robbers who search the world for the best loot from their exhumations.  Until they come across a seemingly great score in Holland.  They take a medallion and are chased around the world by the specter of some supernatural hound.

The first thing that hits you with this story is the language.  It is probably the most beautifully told stories I’ve read from Lovecraft yet.  He takes his time and delicately lays the foundations slowly, unveiling the booty the grave robbers have purloined.  Then he describes the need for further exploration.  The desire and greed for more.  Then once the medallion is revealed, we go on a roller coaster of horror, with danger in every step.

Particularly of interest to me was the fact that we get such a glimpse of the Necronomicon.  We get a description of what the book looks like and a bit of it’s terrible contents, and what is more compelling is that these two gallants were using the Necronomicon to search out new items.

That being said, I have to think there is some meaning behind the name St. John, the narrators companion.  He is one of the main drivers of the story as he is the one who actually takes the medallion and is the first in the Hound’s catastrophic path.

Another interesting aspect of this story is the Hound itself.  We find out at the end of the story that when the narrator exhumes the grave again, that the skeleton that was originally buried in, he finds the medallion back around the skeletons neck, but now the skeleton has grown fangs and has a strange phosphorescent glow from its eyes.  There is also hair and skin attached to the bones.  Was this a grave of a priest to some great dog god?

Then we have the Jade connection.  I can only assume that the phosphorescent glow was a green glow, which hearkens back to “The Doom that came to Sarnath”, and the strange green glow that was sent down from the moon.  Did they awaken a moon god?

Then there is the Necronomicon to consider (not to mention it’s supposed immolation.  Could this really be the end of the Necronomicon?  I wonder where in the chronology this story fits in).  This was written by the infamous mad Arab Alhazred, who was purportedly a demonologist.  Could the demons be connected to the Great Old Ones?  Is this a separate deific scale to worry about in the Lovecraftian ethos?

 

What do you think?


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Moon-Bog

Here is another connecting thread, assuming that Lovecraft meant to have his stories in the same world (which I tend to think he did).

The story follows our nameless narrator as he treads to Ireland to join his friend at his new estate in Kilderry.  Denys Berry wants to drain a bog next to his mansion (dare I say castle?  Our narrator does stay in a tower, and this would feed into a much more gothic scene.), but the locals are worried about something, and they leave when he mentions his plans.  Eventually we have some very strange happenings, and virtually everyone dies, with the exception of our narrator.

There are a few interesting connectors in this story.  The narrator makes mention of Grecian architecture buried in the bog.  Again we have this marbleized Greek architecture which has now shown up in many tales.  Does this have a connection?  Were the Greeks and Romans influenced by the Great Old Ones?  Were in fact (in the Lovecraft world) the Greek and Roman gods the Cthulhu pantheon?  Was that how they had so much power and stretched their influence all the way up to the Germanic tribes of the British Isles?

The second connector is the moon.  I haven’t seen the moon referenced for a while yet, however it is present here and is a determining factor (it’s even in the title!).  In past stories the moon was a location for some kind of deity that sent creatures down to earth (Think The Doom that came to Sarnath).  Could it be that the titular bog is actually a placeholder for the moon?  The action all happens under the moon light, and is gone in the light of day.  The only think we’re missing is the mysterious green light, that floats down from the moon, but that could be because of the Grecian influence.  The only time the green light flows down was in the North Americas which were beyond the Grecian influence.  Hopefully we’ll get some light (see what I did there?) shown on this in future stories.

What do you think?

Join me next Tuesday for a Blind Read of “The Hound”


Blind Read Through: H.P. Lovecraft; The Temple

Sorry for being late with this installment of the Blind Reads.  I’m back on schedule so you can expect another one coming tomorrow!

This story, at first glance, seems like a fairly innocuous and straight forward horror story (for as much as Lovecraft has straightforward stories, that is).  In fact there is a Twilight Zone episode (aired in 1963, this was, for me, the scariest of the Twilight Zone episodes.  Check it out here:  http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5rouxl

The basic premise is that a German u-boat takes down a British ship, then submerge.  When they come back up, they find that (supposedly) one of the crewmen is dead and clenched onto the submarine.  When they extricate him from the metal railing, they find that he has a marble statue, which they take.  Then while they are throwing the body over the edge, a few of the sailors swear that the dead body opens his eyes.  Then, another sailor swears that he swam away instead of just sinking.

The crew goes on and they all start to see and hear things that makes them go a little crazy.  The submarine eventually has problems and sinks, seemingly surrounded by dolphins.  Those dolphins follow them down to depths not known for dolphins, and as they sink the crew starts a mutiny.  Eventually it is just the narrator and one other, and the other holds onto the marble statue and eventually goes crazy.  He tells our narrator that he wants them to join him.  The last of the crew leaves the submarine, far too low beneath the waters to live and kills himself.  We think.  Then as the submarine slides deeper into the waters, there is an Atlantean civilization there, complete with a temple that has the same face as the marble statue.

This is obviously a massive abridgment, but I wanted to get a few ideas out.  The first is that of the marble statue.  I have now read about marble and it’s use as channeling some otherworldly being in a few of these stories.  It does not seem coincidental that the statue that corresponds to this buried temple is made of marble.  The second is the city itself.  We have a possible Atlantis in the world of Lovecraft, and because of the marble connection, this ties into the story, “The Tree”.  Atlantis is an ancient city buried under the water, which would go along with the idea of the Great Old Ones being buried in the earth.  This was probably a civilization that worshiped the Great Old Ones, and for some reason it was buried.  Probably the same time that Cthulhu was put to rest in the earth.

Lastly we have these strange dolphins.  I normally would have thought this just a strange story addition, but because of just reading “Arthur Jermyn” I think there may be more to this.  Could these strange dolphins who don’t seem bothered by the intense pressure of being that deep in the ocean, actually be the denizens of this Atlantis?  It seems to be so, because they seem to follow, during the story, but I would purport that they actually led U-29 to the city.

There is one more things that I cant quite figure, however.  At the beginning of the story, there is a script that says that this manuscript was found on the coast of the Yucatan.  There has to be meaning to this, because in every other story I’ve read Lovecraft just jumps into the story.  There is no explanation for the reason behind the story.  I have to think there is some significance to the Yucatan.  Does anyone have any insight?

Join me tomorrow for a Blind read of The Moon-Bog!